TIHR 70 Festival programme goes live!

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Posted on behalf of Juliet Scott, Business Development Manager & Festival Director


We are delighted to launch the website for ‘Reimagining Human Relations in Our Time’, a festival celebrating 70 years of the Tavistock Institute.


At the heart of the festival is the Institute’s archive which over the last two years has been intricately and delicately catalogued at Wellcome Library. These two things coinciding – our anniversary and the launch of the archive – are a great cause for celebration because the insights of our forebears as they tackled past societal challenges are now available to you. How might we take inspiration from their learning as we grapple with today’s major concerns, such as an environment at tipping point, ageing and social care, displaced people and populations, crises in faith, identity and leadership, and our wellbeing at work?

TIHR Festival postcard

The festival website is the starting place for you to join us in these questions with access to a rich programme offering opportunities to take part, reflect, dream, debate, consider, listen and observe, and perform.

TIHR festival programme includes a range of events

With its online booking system and easy to view programme you will be able to curate your own festival experience, keep in touch with festival news, and access recordings, reflections, and photographs posted following each event via the festival’s ‘ArchLive’.


We look forward to seeing you in October.


Juliet Scott, Festival Director

Eliat Aram, CEO TIHR


+44 7950 809699


HARG Members

Forthcoming symposium on exploring hospital records at the London Metropolitan Archives

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EXPLORING HOSPITAL RECORDS AND ARCHIVES: A Symposium Event for Researchers and Archivists

The event is relevant for people starting their research (undergraduate or postgraduate) or those wanting to explore new routes into academic or historical explorations

Researching hospital records offers opportunities and presents challenges. Records from the Royal Free Hospital will provide a main focus for the event, alongside other related material from the London Metropolitan Archives (LMA) collections.

There will also be the opportunity to share research ideas, exchange information and network with others researching a range of topics relating to hospital records.


12.30 – 2pm
Registration and Welcome

•       Networking Lunch
•       Behind the Scenes Tour – an introduction to the archive and its work
•       Document / Collection Viewing – a chance to see and discuss original materials

Presentations and Open Forum: Accessing and Using Archive Collections

LMA staff will:

•       Introduce the range and type of collections held on site
•       Discuss ways of working with sensitive and challenging material
•       Open up ideas about how Royal Free Hospital record collections have been used to engage and inform the public


Workshop and Knowledge Share

This practical session will provide participants with an opportunity to discuss, plan and share current research or project work, discuss new proposals and consider the potential of partnership working.

4.20pm Final Round Up

Funded by The Wellcome Trust



London Metropolitan Archives, 40 Northampton Road, London EC1R 0HB
Friday 28 April 2017
FREE – Booking Essential (Lunch is provided)


Assessing popular medicine in Welsh literature

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The National Library of Wales (Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru) are currently assessing their medical and public health books within their Welsh Print Collection.  Welsh interest in medicine and the medical has a long pedigree dating back to the Physicians of Myddfai and beyond. Welsh works on medicine date back to William Salesbury’s 16th century treatise on herbs and herbal medicines, Llysieulyfr, not published until 1916, through to the profusion of books on popular medicine published in the 18th and 19th centuries and towards the present day.

The National Library are published a series of blogs about their finds, with the initial post focusing on late 18th and early 19th century popular medical literature, where there was a boom in the publication on the subject. The growth in the publication of books on the subject during this period was part of a boom in the publication of books on specialist subjects for the general reader that was fuelled by the emergence of a growing literate population, hungry for new knowledge of all kinds.

Williams’ Pharmacopoeia was a bilingual book that offered herbal remedies for a large range of maladies ranging from asthma and rheumatism to liver complaints, scurvy and consumptive fits, along with recipes and instructions for preparation of a good poultice, bitter wine, purging drinks and the ever-so-appetising syrup of turnips…

Read more here:


UK Medical Treasures: Erasmus Darwin’s Prescription book, Derbyshire Record Office

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These notebooks are a series of medical practice records, covering the 1740s to 1780s. Each entry deals with an individual patient, recording symptoms and treatment. It’s clear that there is more than one style of handwriting in the books, but we believe the later entries to be the work of Erasmus Darwin (1731-1802) who moved […]

via Treasure 48: Erasmus Darwin’s prescription notebooks — Derbyshire Record Office


Upcoming History of Medicine events at the Festival of Creative Learning at The University of Edinburgh

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The Lothian Health Services Archive (LHSA) are holding two workshops as part of The Festival of Creative Learning at The University of Edinburgh (20th – 24th February).

On 20th and 22nd February, Samar Ziadat will be running workshops on ‘Making History’. Exploring the collections through a crafty zine-making sessions, we’ll be taking a closer look at the achievements of some notable but lesser-known women in our collections.

Sign up here:
Monday 20th February:…
Wednesday 22nd February:…

Also occurring during the festival, on 23rd and 24th February, Surgeons Hall will be hosting a history of medicine Wikipedia editathon. We’ll be working with librarians, archivists, academic colleagues and the University’s Wikimedian-in-Residence to improve the quality of articles about the history of medicine on Wikipedia.

Sign up here:…

You don’t need to be a dab hand at zine-making or a Wikipeida expert to get involved with either of these – the Festival of Creative Learning is all about trying something new. You can find out more about the full programme on the Festival website: