HSRAA Annual Conference 2018 and Pre-Conference Workshop Tickets NOW ON SALE

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Members may be interested in the Health Sciences Records and Archives Association (The HSRAA) Annual Conference is being held between 25th April and 27th April 2018 in Brighton.


To find out more about the agenda, click here.

To find out more about the venue and location, click here and to find out more about accommodation and travel, click here.

The conference will open at 09:00am on 26th April 2018 with the day closing around 5:00pm. Day 1 is followed at 7:00pm with a drinks reception and conference dinner.

On Friday 27th April 2018 there is full programme of presentations throughout the day with the conference ending at 3:00pm to allow plenty of time for delegates to get to the airport for their return flights or other transportation home.

The agenda is currently under development and will include a range of presentations covering topics of interest to records managers, archivists and related functions in healthcare / life sciences. The HSRAA currently has confirmed expert speakers from industry and regulators, including the MHRA and EMA. Six panel sessions have been scheduled for the two days.

Thursday 26th April 2018
Document Management
Digital Archiving

Friday 27th April 2018
GxP Data Integrity
Legal and Intellectual Property


For more information please check the HSRAA website (




Upcoming seminar: Approaches to Opening Up Medical Records, London Metropolitan Archives

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Date: Fri 19 January 2018

Time: 09:30 – 13:30 GMT

London Metropolitan Archives, 40 Northampton Road, London, EC1R 0HB


At this professional seminar, LMA and St Bartholomew’s Hospital Archives will share their approaches to opening up access to medical records in their collections through two current projects funded by the Wellcome Trust Research Resources in Medical History scheme. Speakers include: Philippa Smith, Lara Speroni, Giorgia Genco, Kate Jarman and Rebecca D’Ambrosio.


You can register for free for this event via Eventbrite:




Unlocking the Asylum Project at Denbighshire Archives

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My name is Lindsey Sutton and I am the Project Archivist employed on the Wellcome funded Unlocking the Asylum project at Denbighshire Archives. The project began in October of this year and is due to run until November 2019.

The North Wales Hospital, Denbigh, was the main institution in North Wales for the care of the mentally ill. The institution opened in October 1848 serving the whole of North Wales and the borders. A century later, its patients numbered in excess of 1,500. It was by far the biggest employer in the area and activities recorded in its voluminous archives reflect its importance in the social and economic life of the area, with its farm, sporting activities, community events and cultural festivals.

The hospital finally closed its doors in 1995. The resulting archive is unique in its completeness including: patient records; annual reports and committee minutes; financial records; plans; and staff records.

The project team is made up of three roles. There is the Project Archivist (myself), whose role is to produce an itemised catalogue of the existing accessions re-catalogued to current standards and an itemised catalogue of later accessions of administration records. There is a Project Support Officer who will spend two years indexing and repackaging the later series of patient case files, some 23,000 in total.

Finally there is the Project Conservator who has been employed for three months to assess the collection for conservation needs and suggest preventive preservation measures.

We are now three months into the project and the first phase to re-catalogue the existing accessions is now complete, the temporary catalogue is available online via the Denbighshire Archives website.

Work is also well under way on the indexing and repackaging of the patient files, of which just under 1000 have been completed. Additionally a detailed conservation survey has been completed, the repackaging recommendations of which will be implemented next year.

If you would like to find out more about this project please see our two recent blog posts which look at the plans for repackaging the series of maps and plans, and take a closer look at the information contained within the patient files predating the establishment of the National Health Service in 1948.

Unlocking the Asylum: Unrolling the Archive

Exploring the Asylum: Patient Case Books

We will continue to post regular updates throughout the project on our blog and Facebook pages.


‘Putting Flesh on the Bones: Unlocking the Calvin Wells Archive and Book Collection’ at the University of Bradford

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The Calvin Wells Archive Collection, created by renowned palaeopathologist Calvin Wells (1908-1978) will be the focus of a brand new cataloguing project thanks to a grant of nearly £140,000 from the Wellcome Trust.

The project which started in June 2017 and will run for 18 months, will undertake the cataloguing, digitisation and promotion of the Calvin Wells Archive and Book Collection with the intention of creating a valuable resource for the study of palaeopathology, osteology and bioarchaeology.

Once catalogued, it is anticipated that Wells’ bone reports, associated research notes, and radiographic and photographic material will inform and motivate new and on-going scientific research. The catalogue will be made available for consultation on Archives Hub and digitised items will be viewable via the University of Bradford Special Collections’ online portal.

In addition to the archive collection, the project will catalogue Wells’ significant library of medical, archaeological and anthropological texts.  The books, which date from the 17th century to the 1960s, include works on early humans, on ancient civilisations and on archaeological topics such as frost tombs.

The project is being led by Dr Jo Buckberry from the Biological Anthropology Research Centre, School of Archaeological and Forensic Sciences, and Alison Cullingford from Special Collections, both based at the University of Bradford. Delivering the project will be Project Archivist James Neill with the assistance of an Osteologist, Conservator, Librarian and Placement Student.

Please visit our project blog at:

The project recently featured in the Guardian:


A Health Archives and Records Group Survey on GDPR Readiness

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The HARG Committee would like to gather some information on how organisations have been preparing so far for the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May 2018 and find out the most useful type of support that the committee can provide to those working with health records in a variety of workplace settings.

This quick survey should take around 5 minutes to complete and will be used for the purposes of collating information from HARG members regarding GDPR. Please fill in the form on the link below and return it via email to Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any additional comments.

Survey form available below:

Protected Health Archives and Records Group Survey on GDPR Readiness