London

Upcoming Health Archives and Records Group AGM, London Metropolitan Archives, Friday 7 December 2018

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The next Health Archives and Records Group meeting will be held at the London Metropolitan Archives on 7 December 2018, 2-4.30pm. The afternoon session will include a presentation by the NHS at 70 team and a talk on the new exhibition, Child Health in London, at the London Metropolitan Archives.

Prior to the group meeting there will also be an opportunity in the morning to meet three digital preservation software vendors, Arkivum, Max Communications and Preservica to hear in-depth presentations and demonstrations of their products and answering specific questions about cost, installation and ongoing support costs. This session is scheduled from 10.30am-1pm.

Please see the agenda below. If you are interested in attending either the morning or the afternoon please email: christopher.olver@kcl.ac.uk to confirm your attendance and which session you would be interested in attending.

 

Health Archives and Records Group Annual General Meeting

Friday 7 December 2018, 2-4.30pm

London Metropolitan Archives, 40 Northampton Rd, Clerkenwell, London EC1R 0HB

  1. 14:00: Welcome and introductions
  2. 14.00-14.25: Talk on Collaborative Guidance. Speaker: Caroline Simpson (National Archives)
  3. 14.25-14.50: Appii demonstration: a system for verified credentials using Blockchain technology and its applications for students and employers. Speaker: (Gary McKay, Appii)
  4. 14.50-15.15: NHS at 70 project: Speakers: Angela Whitecross and Peter Mitchell (both University of Manchester)
  5. 15.15-15.20: Minutes and matters arising relating to last meeting
  6. 15:20-15:35: HARG Committee report (Administration, website, events, plans for 2019)
  7. 15.35-15.55: National Archives health sector update
  8. 15:55-16:15: Open forum/sector and partner news
  9. 16:15-16:30: Optional guided tour of child health exhibition
  10. 16:30: Close.

 

 

Archives

New publication on the history of the National Hospital and its Institute of Neurology

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A new history of the Queen Square Institute of Neurology has recently been published. The book, Queen Square: A History of the National Hospital and its Institute of Neurology celebrates its fluctuating fortunes, and engrossing history, from foundation to its eventual amalgamation with University College London Hospital (UCLH) in 1996, and the absorption of the Institute of Neurology into University College London (UCL) in 1997. The book is over 550 pages in length and includes over 120 photos and images, along with biographies of many deceased former members of staff.

The objective of the authors (Simon Shorvon, Alastair Compston, Andrew Lees, Michael Clark, and Martin Rossor) is to place the story of the hospital within the wider contexts of British social history and the development of British neurology in the modern age. A broadly chronological approach has been adopted in the narrative, divided into three distinctive periods; 1859–1902, 1903–45 and 1946–97. The authors also revisit certain themes throughout the book to show that these have on repeated occasions influenced the course of the history of the hospital and its reciprocal engagement with the wider national and international community.

Queen Square: A History of the National Hospital and its Institute of Neurology will be available to purchase in early November 2018 online at https://www.nationalbrainappeal.org/how-to-support-us/shop/ with all proceeds of sales going to the National Brain Appeal.

To read more about the publication, please visit the following link: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ion/alumni/queen-square-alumnus-association-newsletter-issue-12/queen-square-history-national-hospital

 

London

Last chance to sign up for the History of Medicine course at the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries, starting 8 September 2018

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The Faculty of History and Philosophy of Medicine and Pharmacy still have places on the History of Medicine, and “Ethics and Philosophy of Healthcare Courses” starting on 8 September 2018.

The History of Medicine offers a range of classes from ‘Greek and Roman Medicine’ to ‘Ayurvedic Medicine’, ‘Psychiatry’ into modern medicine. The Ethics and Philosophy of Healthcare encourages conversations, debate on current issues of ‘Global Ethics, Divine Command Morality, Autonomy, Consent and Confidentiality’ and more. For information on courses – see here.

The courses run for a year leading to the Diploma examination, DHMSA or DPMSA. The course is open to everyone and we have a mix of professionals, students and retired individuals on the course. If not sitting the examination a ‘Certificate of Attendance’ can be provided. There’s lots of course materials, reading lists, visits, access to past papers; and dissertations. The course days are mainly held at Apothecaries’ Hall, one Saturday a month and in one of the oldest Livery Halls in London.

The course fee is £800 and for students it is £600. There are still a few examination bursaries left which discounts the full rate of the exams. The examination fee is separate to the course fee and is payable closer to the deadline date. Please see ‘Examinations’ – click here. Once you complete 70% attendance required to sit the exam, you have up to three years to take the exam itself including the year you begin the course.

Other bursaries are available.

Quotes from the courses

The course is excellent value for money

Fantastic speaker and interesting topic

I thought that this lecture was very clear and engaging in dealing some complex topics; thank you!

The lecturer’s approach is to be especially commended for its rigour

I really enjoyed discussing everyone’s cases and would love to do them again

Fabulous session, only complaint is it could have been longer

Archives

Workshop on wearable medical device data, 23 July, King’s College London

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Workshop on wearable medical device data
23 July 2018, 09.30-16.00
Great Hall, King’s College London

The Health Archives and Records Group is hosting a free, day-long workshop on data collected by wearable medical devices. These range from simple blood pressure monitoring devices used by keep-fit enthusiasts to clinical equipment used in the more complex care of patients with chronic, difficult to manage conditions such as Type 1 diabetes and lung disease. This is a rapidly evolving technology with major sensitivity concerns, and so records managers and archivists with responsibility for health related data in the NHS, private health care, pharmaceuticals, university and other sectors may find this workshop particularly useful.

The day will include quick-fire talks from device manufacturers and service providers, records managers, researchers, policy advisors and others, and will cover the creation and management of data, ethical and legal concerns, storage, digital preservation and re-use of data for research or other purposes. There will also be practical sessions, discussion and debate around current issues, likely future developments and next steps for the implementation of appropriate and sustainable standards and protocols around this data.

Confirmed speakers to date:

Dr Natalie Banner (‘Understanding Patient Data’ project, Wellcome Trust)

Professor Patricia Grocott (Professor of Nursing Technology and Innovation, King’s College London)

Dr Martyn Harris (Institute of Coding, Birkbeck University)

Tim Kendall (UK Caldicott Guardian Council and Chair of the London Caldicott Guardian Network)

Dr Rebecca Lynch (Research Fellow (Medical Anthropology), London School of Hygiene and Tropic Medicine)

Russell Joyce (Health Sciences Records and Archives Association)

Chris Robson (Entrepreneur and CEO of ‘Living With…’ condition management platform)

Full programme and further details to follow.

 

If you are interested in booking one of the remaining places at the event, please contact Clare Button at Clare.Button@ed.ac.uk

Archives

Moving the RCS Archives

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Louise King: Archivist, The Royal College of Surgeons of England

In June 2017 the archives of the Royal College of Surgeons of England (the College/ RCS) moved to the London Metropolitan Archives (LMA)…well, most of them did…and they haven’t moved forever…it’s a long story but I will try to keep it brief!

In May 2015, I attended my first meeting to discuss how we would move the archive collections out of the building, where to, for how long, and how we would prepare them for this upheaval. Over the next two years I attended a lot of meetings, counted a lot of things relating to archives and was grateful to a lot of very hardworking individuals. Don’t get me wrong, the work on the archives didn’t suddenly start that day in 2015, it had been going on since the start of the century when the College appointed its first professional archivist, but the prospect of a move makes you think about things differently.

As well as the archives, the library and the museums needed to move the majority of their collections out too, but my focus was the archives. The reason for the move was that, by 2015, the College was made up of parts that had mostly gone up since the 1950s (the only 19th century parts were the portico, the Library and the entrance hall) and was no longer fit for the College’s activities and staff in the 21st century.

Preparation:
Our small team already carried out the processing, including basic repackaging when required, and promotion of the archives. Our archive collections (a mix of the College’s own papers and those relating to the history of surgery) were housed in a number of rooms in the basement (of course!) of the College. They weren’t perfect but they were adequate. With the prospect of the College being largely knocked down and rebuilt, and relying on other people to work with our collections, we now had to look at the collections and what we did with a different eye.  We had to consider questions such as: are the collections packaged well enough to protect them during journeys in a van and are the box labels correct and clear if you aren’t familiar with our collections? Every archive has labels that have been amended but not printed off again, yet, but when other people will be handling the boxes for you, suddenly these potentially confusing labels appeared to be on every other box!

Conservator Kostas Tsafaridis showing the Archives team how to make phase boxes

In May 2015 we were a team of just 1.5 people (with occasional volunteers) but to prepare for the move we took on someone to backfill the daily tasks for me and a cataloguer. The meetings I attended were largely to discuss the logistics not only of our own move, but to ensure that we didn’t clash with the library or museums as well as the rest of College. We also had to make the arrangements for the off-site storage with our new partners.

We decided that using barcodes on the archive boxes would be beneficial both during the move and for tracking future movements. Tablets and scanners were bought, each pair of barcodes were put on a short and a long side of each box. We then scanned the barcodes into an Excel spreadsheet because we were unable to scan straight into Adlib.

Harrow Green unloading the first cages of archive boxes at LMA

We used Harrow Green for the moves of the archives and of the library. For the archives we just used them on moving days but the library also used them to help with packing up the books (wrapping in tissue, moving to temporary locations). We all agreed how fantastic the team working on our project were!

The Move:
The moving days were possibly the easiest part of the whole project. Most of the archives were moved during one warm week in June. Three days were spent shuttling between the College (near Holborn) and the LMA (Clerkenwell) and one day going out to TNA at Kew. Archives staff were at each end to oversee the Harrow Green staff loading boxes into cages, onto and then off the vans before going onto their new shelves.

Archivists Sophie Gibbs and Fahema Begum with trollies ready to relocate

They felt like long days! Harrow Green like to start early, to get as many van loads done as they safely can in a day, so we took it in turns to be in early and rotated the other posts.

The shelves at LMA were already barcoded and we have put barcodes on the shelves we are using at TNA, so once boxes were unloaded, the barcode on their new shelf was scanned into the spreadsheet.

Post-move:
You’d think that the rest of the summer would have been quiet and an anti-climax. I was now an archivist separated from the bulk of her archives (without the means to provide access) and the rest of the College was gradually being packed up. But that meant that people started finding “things” for the archives so we had to start a new series of “uncatalogued” boxes (which we then moved along with the office contents in September). We also needed that time to input the new locations into the catalogue. All too soon, we were moving out of our office at the College, the Library was no longer “ours” as the whole building was handed over to the contractors, and we moved our last boxes over to LMA.

The Library just before it was handed over to the contractors in September 2017

The last of the (archives, library and museums) project staff left in August. The Archives team is back to 1.5 people working in both Holborn and at LMA.. The current situation takes a lot of explaining to some people but our researchers are gradually venturing to Clerkenwell where LMA staff retrieve the boxes and invigilate the Archives Study Area. The arrangements all seem to be working well so far.

The Future:
The architects are hard at work on the plans. Knowing that we will only have a fraction of the on-site storage that we used to, we are making plans for long-term off-site storage and retrievals. While the Library and the front of the College won’t be changing much, their use will be. This means that we are now planning a search room from scratch. It will be smaller (we used to have the whole Library) but will be easier to invigilate and provide services for researchers. The College is due to re-open in 2020.

If anyone reading this is planning a move, particularly of cross-domain collections, do get in contact as we would be happy to share our experiences and lessons learned.